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Electric Vehicle Manufacturers May Have Exaggerated Battery Ranges

by | May 24, 2022 | Class Actions

Edelson Lechtzin LLP is investigating recent reports that manufacturers of electric cars and SUVs (EVs) have exaggerated the battery capacity of these plug-in vehicles.  

Do EVs meet advertised battery capacities?

Electric vehicle manufacturers provide estimates of vehicle ranges. However, it has been alleged that many of these ranges are wholly unrealistic and obtainable. In Europe, vehicles are provided with an official estimated battery capacity compiled using computerized estimations known by the acronym “WLTP,” or Worldwide Harmonized Light Vehicle Test Procedure. The purpose of compiling these numbers is to allow purchasers to make a material comparison across all vehicle makes and models. Unfortunately, the data is often unreliable. Additionally, data for high-speed long-distance driving is not available.

Are there consumer complaints about EV battery capacity?

Yes. Drivers have indicated shortfalls of nearly 60% of battery capacity for some vehicles, with many vehicles falling short by over 50%. In the real world, drivers may experience worse results as manufacturers often recommend recharging a vehicle to only 80% of capacity thereby limiting the range even further.

Is there a standard measure for battery range?

No. While traditional gas-powered vehicles are provided with gas mileage estimates, which can only be reproduced under ideal driving conditions, the battery ranges provided by electric vehicle manufacturers appear to be far worse in real-world conditions than their gas-powered counterparts and are wholly unobtainable.

What can I do if my EV falls short of its advertised driving range?

If you have purchased or leased an electric vehicle and have experienced a battery range that is below the manufacturer’s estimate, please contact the attorneys at Edelson Lechtzin LLP for a free consultation. You can learn about your legal rights by calling toll-free at 844-696-7492 or by completing the form below.